LASITHI PLATEAU & ZEUS CAVE

 The Lasithi Plateau is approximately 70 km east from Heraklion and lies at an average altitude of 840 m (2,760 ft), which makes it one of the few permanently inhabited areas of such altitude around the Mediterranean. Winters are often very harsh and snow on the plain and surrounding mountains can persist until mid-spring. Lasithi plateau is famous for its white-sailed windmills that have been used for decades to irrigate the land. Despite their vast number (some 10,000) in the past, most of them have been abandoned nowadays in favour of modern diesel and electrical pumps.

The Cave of Zeus is a system of caves located on the slopes of Mount Ida, on the island of Crete, Greece. The deep cave has a single entrance and features beautiful stalagmites and stalactites. In antiquity it was a place of worship, because it was believed to be the cave where the goddess Rhea hid the infant Zeus, in order to protect him from his father Cronus.According to a variant of this legend, the Kouretes, a band of mythical warriors, undertook to dance their wild, noisy war dances in front of the cave, so that the clamour would keep Cronus from hearing the infant’s crying. Excavations have revealed a large number of votive cult offerings on the site.